THE SPECIES THAT LIVE IN THE RESERVE

Main Fauna

There are five species of ungulates that live in the entire Reserve: Three are deer; European deer, roe deer, fallow deer; one is swine, the wild boar; and one is a bovid, the mouflon. Both the ungulates and the wolves represent one of most important numerical populations in the whole of the Appenines. When it comes to carnivores we can only talk about the past regarding bears, which became extinct in the first decades of the 1800s as a result of ruthless hunting, but are remembered with place names in the mountains (Siepe dell'Orso, Ca' dell'Orso, etc.). As for felines, it has recently been confirmed that wild cats live in the territory of the Reserve and its surrounds. The presence of the lynx is debatable, as historically it can’t be ascertained when they lived in the central Appenine Ridge; some have certainly been in the Reserve, but the provenance of this animal is uncertain.

 

Small mammals

The presence of small mammals is important (non-flying mammals that weigh less that 1kg), as they are an important food source for many species of predators such as weasels, martens, foxes, and daytime and nocturnal birds of prey. 21 species have been discovered, amongst which there are 5 species of shrew, the dormouse, the vole, the hedgehog and the red squirrel.

 

Bats

The species of bats living in the National Park represent 72% of those found in the whole of the Tuscan and Emilia Romagna regions. The relationship between the forest ecosystem and bats is very close and is particularly significant for most of the species, which frequent woodland environments as a refuge and a hunting ground for insects. The most common bats are; the noctule, the barbastelle, the big-eared, the horse-shoe and the vesper. 

 

Birdlife

Inside the forest are ‘disorganised’ parts that are particularly valued by ornithological species, such as the varied undergrowth, the presence of dead trees, small gaps in the woodland cover, rocky areas, as well as important variations in inclines and clearings and mountain plains in the areas around the summit. Over 50 species of bird populate this area, the most prevalent being those that most like a woodland environment. Of particular note are the; golden eagle, eagle owl, peregrine falcon, kestrel, goshawk, sparrow hawk, and buzzard, regarding birds of prey, and the; black, green and red woodpeckers, house finch, redstart, robin, treecreeper and many others

 

Amphibians and reptiles

The Reserve hosts 5 species of amphibians and 2 species of reptiles. Sasso Fratino is an essential natural fortification for the fire salamander, speleomantes italicus, salamandrina terdigitata, crested newt and frogs. Reptiles include the; common viper, grass snake, green whip snake, glass snake, aesculapian snake and the wall lizard.

 

Invertebrates

Thanks to the enormous amount of data available from the "Repertorio sistematico topografico della Flora e della Fauna vivente e fossile della Romagna" (Systematic topological catalogue of the living and fossilised flora and fauna of Romagna) by Pietro Zangheri, the knowledge of invertebrates which exist in Sasso Fratino is almost complete. In this publication the number of invertebrates mentioned for this area is almost 600 taxa, belonging to 3 phyla: annelids (4), molluscs (8), anthropoids (8), crustaceans, 7 chilopoda, 4 diplopoda, 29 arachnids and other 500 insects.

Bats

The species of bats living in the National Park represent 72% of those found in the whole of the Tuscan and Emilia Romagna regions. The relationship between the forest ecosystem and bats is very close and is particularly significant for most of the species, which frequent woodland environments as a refuge and a hunting ground for insects. The most common bats are; the noctule, the barbastelle, the big-eared, the horse-shoe and the vesper.

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